Fred Flintstone and Barney Rubble

Fred and Barney? Some characters’ names are self-explanatory. Others require contemplation.

My blog, THE NAME GAME, explained how my father named me after a character in a Zane Grey western. The character, Terrill Lambeth, carried the name of her uncle who had died in the Civil War.

This is how Grey described the event on the first page of West of the Pecos.

“The baby came and it was a girl. This disappointment was the second of Lambeth’s life, and the greater. Lambeth never reconciled himself to what he considered a scurvy trick of fate….He never changed the name Terrill. And though he could not help loving Terrill as a daughter, he exulted in her tomboy tendencies…”

I don’t want to imply that my gender disappointed my father. It didn’t. I had an older brother already and my dad had hoped for a girl. He called me his “little princess.”

Grey sets up Templeton’s motivation to raise his daughter to have the strength and courage expected of a man. She needs to be as tenacious as a man to save the family’s Texas ranch.

(No arguments, please. I agree with you about those qualities being equally present in men and women. Grey wrote within the parameters set by the social culture of his time. Forgive him.)

Do you see how giving Terrill a man’s name sets the reader’s expectations? With a man’s name, she must be as strong and daring as any male hero.

Let me give some more examples of crafty character naming.

Movie Characters, Daisy Buchanan & Jay Gatsby

Author F. Scott Fitzgerald

Characters, Jordan Baker & Nick Carraway

If you haven’t read The Great Gatsby by the American author, F. Scott Fitzgerald, I highly recommend it. Or rent the 1974 movie with Robert Redford and Mia Farrow. It’s a bonus to see Redford in his prime. He’s dreamy even in the pink suit costume designer, Edith Head used for the movie’s tense climactic scene.

Of course, the book is better than the movie.

Fitzgerald chooses names wisely to reflect his characters’ personalities. I’ll examine three.

We know little about Jay Gatsby, the New York millionaire who gives lavish parties, but never attends them. Some say he was a war hero. Some say, a murderer.

SPOILER ALERT

By the end of the book, we discover Gatsby had been born poor and made his fortune illegally as a bootlegger, all to impress Daisy, the wealthy, society woman he lost and wants to win back.

We learn from Gatsby’s father that Jay was born James Gatz. (His father called him Jimmy.) The fact that he changed his name aligns well with his goal to reinvent himself. Lengthen your last name, shorten the first name and, voila—you’re a new man. It’s interesting Fitzgerald didn’t even give Gatsby an entire first name. The initial “J” is more mysterious, don’t you think?

I saw the Gatsby movie in the summer of 1974 in Iowa City, IA. I was visiting my friend, Pam Lyons. We had been editors together on the Benson High News. A freshman, she was studying Journalism at the University of Iowa. The U of I is home of the famous creative writing program—the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

After the movie, Pam and I grabbed a Pepsi for our critique. We were just two literature nerds discussing the foreshadowing, symbolism, and character names. Good times.

Here’s where my memory has played tricks on me. Pam was taking a German class and we looked up the name Gatz and Gatsby in her German dictionary. (Yeah, that’s what writing geeks do.) I could have sworn that we had discovered one of the renditions meant “host” in German. Today, when I Googled “Gatz/Gatsby” to fact-check, I couldn’t confirm that definition.

So, if anyone has a German dictionary or is fluent in German, drop me a line. It would be great to know if I have a faulty memory or whether I’m just fictionalizing again.

If Gatz/Gatsby does mean “host,” it’s a perfect name for the character.

Daisy Buchanan is Jay Gatsby’s one true love. The name makes perfect sense. Daisy is a summer flower, delicate, beautiful. Just like the character. By the end of the summer—in real life and in the book—Daisy is lost. Until another season.

Jordan Baker is Daisy’s wild friend. Daisy wants Nick, (her cousin and Gatsby’s only friend) to get involved with Jordan. Timelessly beautiful, Jordan is a professional golfer, who isn’t beyond cheating to get what she wants. She plays life fast and loose.

1909 Baker Runabout

It’s rumored that Fitzgerald combined the name of two popular car companies to form the character’s name.

Jordan Motor Company produced a model called the Playboy, projecting the image to support the woman’s “fast” reputation.

Baker Motor Vehicles provided automobiles for the White House fleet, promoting the image of the character’s elegance and high social standing.

I tend to simplify the symbolism in the names I choose for my characters.

Amanda Cash is the heroine in Luck of the Draw. She needs money. Doesn’t have enough. Gets to decide who deserves $200 million that an anonymous lottery winner wants to give away.

For my Harmony Hills series, I get to use names from my mother’s generation. I love this opportunity. Simply, love it!

Kay Powers—I want her have a strong name.

Vita Orsi—She’s Italian. Vita means “life” and she’s sure full of that.

Audrey Campbell—I want to invoke the grace and softness of Audrey Hepburn. Then I turn that image on its ear by dressing her in Gothic black corsets and fingerless, leather gloves.

Here are a couple of resources on my bookshelf.

100,000+ Baby Names by Bruce Lansky

Character Naming Sourcebook by Sherrilyn Kenyon

I also like to run a name through this website to check the description.

http://www.kabalarians.com/cfm/what-does-my-name-mean.cfm

Take a minute to look up your name. Does the meaning match your personality?

For more information about the Iowa Writers’ Workshop for creative writing, here’s the link.

http://www.uiowa.edu/~iww/

Until next time…

Read some fiction. Feed your imagination and watch it grow.

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4 Responses to “Fred Flintstone and Barney Rubble”

  1. Alden Lee says:

    My mother named me. She didn’t have baby name books when I was born. She heard my name somewhere once and decided she liked it. So that’s me now.

  2. Teryl says:

    Alden Lee,

    That’s how we named our daughter, Kellini. Her name wasn’t in any baby name book, but we’d heard the name and liked it. That’s a great way to arrive at a name.

    “Alden Lee” does appear in my current baby name book. Alden is English and it means “old; wise protector.” Lee is also English. It’s the shortened form of the name Farley, which means “bull meadow; sheep meadow.”

  3. Maru says:

    What about my name? Maruja? and Aurea?

  4. Teryl says:

    Sweet Maru,

    What can I say? I DID find your names (first and middle) in my baby name book. We can look at them in various ways.

    The book says Maruja is a Spanish form of Mary. The Hebrew meaning for Mary is “bitter” or “sea of bitterness.” Then, of course, there is the Biblical meaning: mother of Jesus.

    If you break apart your first name, you get different meanings. Maru in Japanese means “round.” Ja in Korean means “attractive.” In Hawaiian, Ja means “fiery.”

    Aurea in all its spelling forms is Latin meaning “she who has blond hair” or “golden.”

    Pretty much, I’d say whoever named you didn’t have a clue. :-)

    I love you, you fiery, attractive virgin mother, you.
    Terry

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